SVG and srcset/sizes, a New Challenge for Image Insertion

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Thanks to CSS pixels and the need to reduce file size, there are a lot more problems to solve than simply, “should I use PNG or JPG?”

Before we start, we have to divide website images into two categories: interface images and content images.

Interface Images: Icons, Logotypes, Enhancements

The only sustainable approach here is to use vector graphics. Font icons are a good but temporary solution. The SVG vector format, on the other hand, offers much more interesting options.

When dealing with interface enhancement (custom shadows, buttons or borders) the best choice is to use CSS3 or alternatively, SVG. css-tricks.com/using-svg/

Content Images: Photos

You can export images in huge resolutions (e.g. four times higher than the original) and reduce their sizes in HTML.

You can solve the device-pixel-ratio problem that way.

However, the file size of your website will be so large that users will track you down and beat you to death with their mobile phones.

Just a reminder: an image optimized for Retina displays (2x) does not contain twice the number of pixels but four times the number of pixels (4x). So its file size will also be four times larger.

Therefore, I recommend using the new attributes of the <img> tag — srcset and sizes. ericportis.com/posts/2014/srcset-sizes/




Content

Introduction

Introduction

On today’s frontend UI development

UI development transformations

Tools, technologies and workflows

Fallback strategies

CSS3 reference guide

Introduction

Text properties

Background properties

Border properties

Box properties

Media Queries

CSS transforms

CSS animations

CSS3 Layout

Another CSS3 Properties

Non-standard properties

End

End

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